The dialect of South 24 Parganas

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written by Avishek Naskar

In different walks of the South Twenty-four Parganas district, various folklore words are used in daily life during quarrels, laughing or trading. For example: ‘Dhingi Nachon’ stands for telling slangs with moving body parts. ‘Jereren’ stands for stop or rest. ‘Kandi’ (Kām̐ṛi) means Many. ‘Mang mang’ stands for unexplained or insane talk. ‘Bouni’ stands for the first deal or trade of a shop. ‘Lyad Lede’ means obese or loose. Numerical spoken languages ​​are being used in many places. These are generally used in market places. For example: Two is called ‘Duri’ , three is called ‘tini’, ‘buri gonda’ stands for four, eighty is called ‘pon’ (Paṇa) etc. Five is called by many different words. Such as ‘Pancha’, ‘Panchu’, ‘Panor’, ‘Panchkadi’ (Pām̐cakaṛi) etc.

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In South 24 Parganas, the number of lower middle class people is higher. People living here include peasants, blacksmiths, potteries, weavers, fishermen, ‘baruis’, potteries, ‘patuas’, ‘schuli’, ‘moules’ and ‘bauls’ (folk singer). They remain busy with their earnings. The language they use is dependent on their livelihood or action efforts. There are very few beautiful languages ​​or well-ordered sounds. Some examples: – ‘Koya’ is used as small piece of fruits; like ‘Kathaler Koya’ means the small pieces of Jackfruit.

The people of South 24 Parganas say ‘k-moi’, a type of ladder that is useful for cultivating. “K-moi ta ne ai” (Ka-mō’i Tā nē a’i) means bring the cultivating ladder. ‘Ga otha’ is said to mean getting mad.  In ‘Shraban-Vadra’ (July to September) dogs become furious for breeding . It is being said ‘Ga otha’ by them. Again in this district, the language of the quarrels are24s3 referred to as “Magitar ga othechhe”. To sense ‘raw’, they use ‘ra’. Such as ‘ra mangsha’ means flesh and ‘ra cha’ means black tea. ‘Na’ stands for nine somewhere. Like, ‘Na-ta’ means Nine in count. ‘Na ghar’ stands for ninth room. Again, ‘Na’ is the fourth number in counting relationship matters. Such as ‘Na-Da’, ‘Na mashi’, ‘Na kaka’. ‘Na’ is also called “Sãno”. For example, ‘Sano Masi’ means fourth maternal aunt.  Due to perverse pronunciation, some new words have been matched, such as, ‘Topor’ means crown made of corkwood, ‘Patashi’ means brides crown made of corkwood. Jamir means shiny leaf, used in the sola. From the ancient times, potters are living in South 24 Parganas district. The words used by them are widely used in the 24  Parganas. ‘Tijel’ is a type of pottery, ‘Doye hari’ is patty-yogurt pot, ‘Dalan pots’ are big pots being used in 24 Parganas.

In the South 24 Parganas, the hawkers have traveled from long periods of time. Shrikrishnakirtan mentions the sale of milk in the market. But at one time old hawkers were heard in the streets of old Kolkata. Rabindranath’s “Jivansmriti”, “Chhelebela”, Amrutalal Basu’s memorial and the autobiography ‘Hutompanchar Naksha’ has the information about this. But in the South 24 Parganas’ villages and Ganj hawkers’ uses to call their strange words are made in unorganized, incomplete sentences and incomplete words. Whatever their call may be  found in folklore vocabulary.

“Chai…ice cream, borof” means “Do you want ice cream?”

“Chai…kaidana, biskut, nebonchus” means “Do you want ‘Kaidana’, biscuit or chocolates?”

“Ghugni lebe go” means “Do you want ‘Ghugni’, a spicy dish made of peas.?”

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There are uncountable village rhymes, puzzle, furry are spreaded in the villages of South 24 Parganas. Through it is known as the spoken language of the people, so their simple life has been illustrated too. Presently, no one is giving importance to these spoken words. Because the times have changed, the human society has changed. As a result, rural speech is nothing but ridiculous to people in today’s town. But in our mindset there is the existence of our native mother tongue, Bengali.

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Post Author: Saswati Sarkar

Saswati Sarkar

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